Jennifer Brush

/Jennifer Brush
Jennifer Brush

About Jennifer Brush

Jennifer A. Brush, M.A., CCC/SLP has been working for over 20 years to change the face of dementia care in hospitals, assisted living communities, nursing homes and home care. Prior to establishing her own practice, Jennifer served for many years as the Executive Director of IDEAS Institute, a nonprofit organization that improves the lives of older adults through the conduct of applied research. She is an international speaker and recognized speech-language pathologist known for her work in the areas of memory, swallowing, and environmental interventions for people with dementia. She has served as the Principal Investigator on applied research grants that have examined issues pertaining to dementia, hearing impairment, dining, dysphagia, and the long-term care environment. Her research and consulting in the area of environmental modifications has resulted in improved functioning for people with dementia. Jennifer offers interactive and educational presentations and coaching that help clients bridge the gap between current research findings and the care needs of people with dementia. Jennifer Brush is the co-author of four books: Creative Connections in Dementia Care™; I Care; Environment and Communication Assessment Toolkit™ (ECAT) and A Therapy Technique for Improving Memory: Spaced Retrieval. She is the author of Meal Time Matters and Meal Time Matters at Home, training programs that build nursing assistants' and home caregivers' skills related to dining, swallowing disorders, and safe feeding assistance. Jennifer has authored over 25 articles in peer-reviewed journals, served as guest editor of the journals Seminars in Speech and Language and Perspectives in Gerontology, volunteered as Chair of Professional Development in Gerontology for the American Speech Language Hearing Association Special Interest Group, and was an editorial reviewer for SpeechPathology.com. Jennifer is a member of the American Speech-Language Hearing Association and the Association Montessori Internationale (AMI). Jennifer is honored to be appointed by the Executive Director of AMI to serve as an inaugural member of the Advisory Group for Montessori for Aging and Dementia. This group is responsible for writing the AMI standards for Montessori dementia programs. Jennifer presented her research in the area of dementia at the first international conference for Montessori environments for dementia in Sydney, Australia in 2014, and spoke at the annual AMI meeting in Amsterdam, Netherlands in 2015. She will return to Sydney in November, 2015 to speak about creating supportive environments for the aging.

Are you a dementia friend?

By | 2019-07-31T13:00:40+00:00 July 31st, 2019|dementia, dementia. alzheimers, Uncategorized|

Everyone knows someone who is living with dementia. Who do you know? Would you like to know how you can better support your friend, neighbor, loved one, or co-worker? Would you like to join a global effort in reducing the stigma of dementia? Are you, your organization, group or business interested in making a real difference in your [...]

How to Support Employees Who are Caring for Their Aging Parents

By | 2019-04-24T13:06:42+00:00 April 24th, 2019|aging, alzheimers, caring, dementia, dementia. alzheimers|

You may not realize it, but many of your employees are in the Sandwich Generation.  The term Sandwich Generation is often used to describe individuals who are raising children and caring for their parents at the same time.  Most are also managing a career and juggling a variety of other commitments.  Sound familiar?  You might [...]

Tips for Creating Memory Books to Enable Conversation

By | 2019-03-29T12:47:19+00:00 March 29th, 2019|alzheimers, care partner, communication, dementia, dementia. alzheimers|

For people living with dementia, reading is a preserved skill. Therefore visual aids that include written information can be used as memory supports. Memory books can improve quality of life by: Helping people remember important informationMaking conversation easierReducing responsive (challenging) behaviors, such as exit seeking and repetitive questioningProviding reassurance and comfort A memory book is [...]

Tips for Creating a Supportive Environment for Older Adults

By | 2019-03-29T12:47:29+00:00 March 21st, 2019|Uncategorized|

The "prepared environment" is designed to facilitate independence and exploration. When designing a Montessori environment for older adults, it can be hard to know where to start. Keep these simple tips in mind: The prepared environment for older adults is beautiful and inviting. Those living in the care community can help choose or donate beautiful [...]

The Importance of Being Outside

By | 2018-10-29T13:09:48+00:00 October 29th, 2018|Uncategorized|

Every morning, the first thing I do is pour myself a big mug of coffee.  The second thing I do is take my standard poodle,  Lucy for a walk.  Today, as I watched the sun rise over the maple trees I was in awe of the shades of red, orange and yellow I observed-the [...]

First Person in Mexico to Earn AMI Practitioner Certificate!

By | 2018-08-16T16:27:39+00:00 August 16th, 2018|Montessori|

Congratulations to Julia Ballesteros Senties, the first person in Mexico to earn an AMI Practitioner Certification in Montessori for Dementia and Aging. Julia took the workshop with Jennifer Brush in Minneapolis and then studied with Jennifer for 6 months in the Association Montessori Interationale (AMI) Certificate Program. Julia is a speech and language therapist [...]

Tips for Creating Signs

By | 2018-04-05T18:37:36+00:00 April 5th, 2018|dementia|

Cognitive mapping is our ability to visualize where we are in a certain space.  It allows us to park, go into a store and find our car again, or find the bathroom at night without turning on the lights.  People living with dementia have impaired cognitive mapping skills, so they look for cues in [...]

Improving Mealtime for People Living with Dementia

By | 2018-03-08T14:33:47+00:00 March 8th, 2018|dementia|

Many individuals living with dementia forget to eat or become overwhelmed at the thought of preparing meals or making choices about what to eat.  Rather than care partners taking over every related to meal time, we can often modify the home environment to provide structure, but also gives the person independence, self-esteem and the knowledge [...]

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